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Transitioning to OER: Step Four: Create and Prepare

This guide is for professors interested in teaching their classes using OER, but who may be uncertain about how to go about it.

Create Assessments and/or Assignments

Create, new icon - Free download on IconfinderMany of the resources you find will be ready to go out of the box, including everything from readings to videos to assignments. Other times, you will need to remix items from different sources to make sure all your learning objectives are met. This may include creating your own assignments or assessment tools to make sure that students are achieving learning outcomes. Your campus's Assessment Committee may be able to provide guidance on crafting formative assessment tools. 

Author Content

File:Global Open Educational Resources (OER) Logo - Black and White variation.svgDon't be afraid to author your own course content. If what is already out there is not quite right, take advantage of the many tools you can use to author your own OER.

This extensive list of tools includes both free and priced options.

This article from Affordable Learning Georgia provides tips for OER authors.

OER Commons, one of the largest databases of OERs, has three tools to help you create materials, including Open Author to put together different media, and the Module Builder.

This free online class from Peer 2 Peer University takes you through the process of finding, remixing and creating OERs.

This short read provides best practices for making OERs accessible.

This open books provides help on editing and adapting existing open textbooks for your own use.

More and more open textbooks are being created using the Pressbooks software. This guides you through the process of cloning a Pressbook so you can adapt it as needed.

This open book helps professors see how they can include students in the process of creating an open textbook.