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Anthropology

Using Harvard Style

We use in-text citations and reference lists to guide the reader/viewer/audience member to the sources used to create the item. It is common for individuals who want to learn more about a topic to find and use the sources in a reference list.

Referencing is a two part process:

  • Sources cited in the main text of your work
  • References at the end of your work

Anything you use from a source that is written or produced by another author should be cited in the main text of your work and referenced in a list at the end of your work.

Harvard Style references should contain these four base elements:

  • title of the work
  • author/creator name (who wrote, made, produced, filmed, etc.),
  • date of publication (when was the item published, made, produced, filmed, etc.),
  • publication data (publishing company information, edition, volume and issue numbers, online location)

The format and type of source impacts what is and isn't included in the reference. Look at the drop downs below for examples of how to cite and reference different types of sources.

Harvard Reference and Citation Examples

Click on the arrows to the right for reference and citation examples for each type of source


Note: Formatting of multiple authors follows the same format as books.

Note: Formatting of multiple authors follows the same format as books.
For electronic versions of books and articles see the examples for that format.

Note: Formatting of multiple authors follows the same format as books.

More Help with Harvard Style